ArsRSS Calls and Opportunities http://net18reaching.org/artrss/ Current Term Specific News Feed en-us Tue, 11 Aug 2020 03:00:01 -0500 240 <![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

]]>
7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

]]>
12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

]]>
16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

]]>
11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

]]>
8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

]]>
5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

]]>
4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Water Media National Juried Exhibition - Plano, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
f52d2ad86b9bd91c9a1d327fca1ad4ff
<![CDATA[The Cup, The Mug 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
cab1c7e8a885fcc1265c33fa7a211245
<![CDATA[2020 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Frederick, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,875 in awards. Deadline: Sep 28, 2020

]]>
a70a7358f8aafc7c956af7c8ffac508f
<![CDATA[Small Works 2020 - Clifton Springs, NY]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 19, 2020

]]>
29c0081e7f93c73ff09878c8bff0babe
<![CDATA[Martha's Vineyard Drawing Prize 2020 - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 27, 2020

]]>
58c09afb167655de118897826b0ed0d0
<![CDATA[Strokes of Genius 2020 - Annapolis, MD]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Sep 3, 2020

]]>
d4a8d7f99a81fe2765ab225466ac2a2a
<![CDATA[Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Art Contests - Salem, OR]]> Found: deadline, award
$2,000 award for each winner. Deadline: Sep 25, 2020

]]>
54799253c16dabae14e3e62bc85556a1
<![CDATA[2020 Fine Art Challenge Competition - Wethersfield, CT]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Aug 30, 2020

]]>
2951d78e34d378b52ab69688d25b57be
<![CDATA[Create, Inspire, Connect - Sanibel, FL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,050 in awards. Deadline: Sep 6, 2020

]]>
ca99700c57c97db1254c0bf4d106835a
<![CDATA[CraftBoston Spring and Holiday 2021 - Boston, MA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Cash awards. Deadline: Sep 20, 2020

]]>
b9f335f4ee03b835c54770c989197c7b
<![CDATA[2020 Trawick Prize Finalists announced and Baltimore dominates!]]> Found: submit, awarded, awards, award, juror

Seven Baltimore artists and one DC artist have been selected as finalists for The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, a juried competition and exhibition produced by the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District. More than 300 artists from Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. submitted work to the 18th annual competition.

2020 Trawick Prize Finalists

Erick Antonio Benitez, Baltimore, MD

Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD

Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD

Danni O’Brien, Baltimore, MD

Nara Park, Washington, D.C.

Ginevra Shay, Baltimore, MD

Bria Sterling-Wilson, Baltimore, MD

Daniel Wickerham & Malcolm Lomax, Baltimore, MD

The award winners will be announced on September 2, 2020. The Best in Show, first place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000; third place will be awarded $1,000 and a Young Artist, a finalist who is younger than 30, could win $1,000.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 4 – 26, 2020 at Gallery B, located at 7700 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite E. Gallery hours for the duration of the exhibit will be Friday-Saturday, 12 – 4pm. During operational hours, social distancing will be enforced and face masks must be worn by all visitors.

The 2020 Trawick Prize jurors are:

Larry Cook, 2017 Trawick Prize Winner; Assistant Professor of Photography, Howard University

Carrie Fucile, Professor of Digital Art & Design, Towson University

Noah Simblist, Associate Professor of Art and Chair of Painting & Printmaking; Virginia Commonwealth University.

Founded by the amazing Carol Trawick in 2003, the regional competition is one of the largest prizes to annually honor visual artists. Ms. Trawick, a longtime community activist in downtown Bethesda, also established the Bethesda Painting Awards in 2005. She has served as the Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Strathmore and the Maryland State Arts Council. She founded the Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007 to assist health and human services and arts non-profits in Montgomery County. The Foundation has awarded grants to more than 90 nonprofits in Montgomery County and funds the annual Trawick Prize and the Bethesda Painting Awards.

To date, The Trawick Prize has awarded more than $220,000 in prize monies and has exhibited the work of more than 135 regional artists. 

Previous Best in Show recipients include Richard Clever, 2003; David Page, 2004; Jiha Moon, 2005; James Rieck, 2006; Jo Smail, 2007; Maggie Michael, 2008; Rene Trevino, 2009; Sara Pomerance, 2010; Mia Feuer, 2011; Lillian Bayley Hoover, 2012; Gary Kachadourian, 2013; Neil Feather, 2014; Jonathan Monaghan, 2015; Lauren Adams, 2016; Larry Cook, 2017; Caroline Hatfield, 2018 and Oletha DeVane, 2019.

For more information, please visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

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7 August 2020, 4:59 pm 45e4b586530473e0b184d1753e057897
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, juror
Bummerstein! But Artists need thick skins!

Dear Lenny Campello, 
Thank you so much for your submission to MPA's online exhibition, SHIFT. 
Unfortunately, your work was not chosen by the jurors. We received a very large number of submissions and choosing from among them was very difficult. 
The exhibition will be online from July 15 - August 27. 
The virtual opening of SHIFT will be held on Zoom on Wednesday, July 15 from 7 - 8 PM. If you are interested in attending, please register on our website, www.mpaart.org. 
We very much appreciate your interest in MPA's programs and exhibitions.  
Best regards, 
Nancy Sausser,
Curator and Exhibitions Director

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12 July 2020, 5:14 pm b39be2b3942894819b65523405ae7ed8
<![CDATA[Art Bank call for artists!]]> Found: deadline
Deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

I am pleased to announce that the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) Art Bank Program grant application is now open

The Art Bank Collection is the District of Columbia’s fine art collection. Acquired through an annual request for applications, Art Bank works are loaned to District Government agencies for display in public areas and offices of government buildings. The Art Bank has been a source of recognition and support for local artists since 1986. It now includes nearly 3,000 artworks - none of which is mine, as the city has always declined to acquired any of my works. 

Please view this video (and more here!) to see examples of recently acquired works, or explore the entire Art Bank Collection here - note the lack of any work from yours truly!

The request for applications is now open - including both established and emerging artists living within a 50-mile radius of Washington, DC. District art galleries and nonprofit organizations may also apply on behalf of artists.

The application deadline is Friday, August 7, at 4:00 pm

The Commission will be offering free workshops on Wednesday, June 24, 10:00-11:30 am, and Wednesday, July 1, 4:00-5:30 pm. These session provide information on the grant and guidance on the application process.

Good luck!

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16 June 2020, 6:30 pm 340befc8aec2edd4e1256e121f92d70a
<![CDATA[Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III]]> Found: submission, deadline, award, entry, entr
Deadline: June 18, 2020

Artist Relief Emergency Grants: Cycle III
Organization: Artist Relief
Submission Deadline: June 18, 2020
Award Info: $5,000
Type: Grants & Fellowships
Eligibility: National
Categories: Craft/Traditional Arts, Photography, Drawing, Film/Video/New Media, Mixed-Media/Multi-Discipline, Painting, Sculpture
Online Only: Yes

Details here.

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11 June 2020, 3:45 pm bcdc43d0063f4dd4f3f490020ae07543
<![CDATA[Glen Echo Park Partnership Gallery Request for Proposals 2021]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr
Deadline: June 12, 2020

Glen Echo is seeking proposals from individuals, groups of artists or curators for their 2021 exhibitions.
>>> Details here

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8 June 2020, 2:37 pm a3ea505b5fbdaea8659c41524a3a7cf1
<![CDATA[Call for Artists: Foundry Gallery Artists’ Choice 2020]]> Found: deadline
Deadline: Jul 8, 2020

Open Juried Online Exhibit - 
>>> Details here


Artists’ Choice 2020 —Open Juried Online Exhibit
Exhibition dates August 5 – 30
About: Due to Covid 19 Artists’ Choice 2020 will be exhibited entirely online via The Foundry Gallery’s website www.foundrygallery.org
Eligibility : A National Juried Competition open to all artists 18 and up. There are no size restrictions or themes. Categories to include all 2-D and 3-D work.
All art will be for sale, and the gallery retains a 40% commission. Shipping arrangements made between artist and buyer.

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5 June 2020, 10:00 pm 99f16729faad15e1e254ed582e00ee84
<![CDATA[On the anniversary of a superwoman's death]]> Found: opportunity
A few years ago my courageous mother died... this is my eulogy from that day:
When my father died last year, I began his eulogy by noting that another oak had fallen.

This morning, around 1:25AM, Ana Olivia Cruzata Marrero de Campello, his wife of over 60 years, and my beloved mother, passed on on the day of her 97th birthday.

If my father was an oak, then my mother was an equally strong, but also very pliable, and elegant tree.  When hurricanes attack the mainlands of the world, the strong tall trees often fall, but the pliable ones, like plantain trees, always give with the wind, and survive the storms, and thrive in the drenching rains.

My mother was like a an aged plantain tree, not only immensely strong and pliable, but also giving and nurturing.

Like many Cuban women of her generation and her social-economic background, she had never worked for a living in Cuba, and yet within a few days of our arrival in New York in the 1960s, she was working long hours in a sewing factory, putting her formidable seamstress skills, honed in the social sewing and embroidery gathering of young Cuban girls, to use in the "piece work" process of the New York sewing factories.

As soon as we saved the money, one of the first things that my mother bought was an electric sewing machine - a novelty to her, as she had always used one of the those ancient Singer machines with a foot pedal.

I remember as a child in Brooklyn, that women used to bring her fabric and a page from a magazine with a woman wearing a dress. Without the benefit of a sewing pattern, my mother would whip up a copy of the dress that was more often than not probably better made than the original. As the word of her skills spread, so did her customers and soon she was making more money working at home than at the factory - but she kept both jobs.

I once noted to her that I admired the courage that it must have taken  her to leave her family and immigrate to the United States. "We didn't come here as immigrants," she corrected me. "We came as political refugees, and I initially thought that we'd be back in Cuba within a few years at the most."

When the brutal Castro dictatorship refused to loosen its stranglehold on her birth place, she became an immigrant, and from there on an American citizen from her white-streaked hair down to her heel bone (that's a Cuban saying). Like my father, she loved her adopted country with a ferocity, that I sometimes feel that only people who have been bloodied by Communism can feel for a new, free homeland.

As as I've noted before, Cubans are archaic immigrants... we love this great nation because we recognize its singular and unique greatness; perhaps it is because our forebears had the same chance at greatness and blew it.


I remember as a teenager, once I started going out to parties and things at night on my own (around age 16 or so), that my mother would wait up for me, sitting by the third floor window of our Brooklyn apartment, where she could survey the whole neighborhood and see as far as the elevated LL subway station a few blocks away, to watch me descend the station stairs and trace my way home.

My mother was always fit and, as once described by my father, "flaca como un fusil" (as slim as a rifle). She was strong and fast. She was also quiet, but never silenced, and when needed, could and would command attention.

My mother was always well dressed and superbly coiffed. When we'd go to parties and events, women would always ask her where she'd gotten that dress! The answer was always the same: she'd made it!

At least once a week, to my father's dismay, and in spite of his demands that my mother stop it, she'd get her hair done at the nearby peluqueria (hair dresser).

My dad knew, and respected his limits with my mother. 

I remember one time that my father and I were returning from shopping at the supermarket, dragging one of those wheeled folding carts that could carry four full paper grocery bags. It had been snowing, so the Brooklyn streets were wet and muddy.

When we got to our apartment my father opened the door. He then stood there.

"Go in!" I demanded.

"We'll have to wait," he said gloomily, "Your mother mopped the floor and it's still wet." This giant, tough, street-brawling Galician then looked at me sheepishly, "I'd rather walk through a mine field than step on your mother's wet floor."

I learned a lesson there.

She used to delight in telling stories how, as a child, she would often win the horse races that kids staged around the small country towns where she was raised in Oriente province, where her father was a Mayoral.

"I almost always won," she'd say, and then would add: "Even though I was a skinny girl."

Once, in her seventies, back in the days where you could actually accompany people to the departing gates at airports, we were escorting my oldest daughter Vanessa, who had come to visit, and we were running late. As we got to the airport, we ran to the gate, and to everyone's surprise, Abuela got there first. I still remember how delighted my daughter was that her grandmother could still run like a gazelle.


When I joined the Navy at age 17, my first duty station was USS SARATOGA, which at the time was stationed in Mayport in Florida, and thus my parents decided to migrate south to Florida and moved to Miami... just to be close to me.

They spent the next 40 years in the same apartment while I was stationed all over the world.

The mostly Cuban-American families that lived over the years in that apartment loved my mother, and would always tell me stories about my mother, ever the nurturer, bringing them food when she knew that they were going over tough times, or riding the buses with them, just to show them the routes.

This week, when I arrived in Miami, already somewhat knowing that this was approaching the end, I saw her with tubes coming out of her mouth and her eyes closed. When I spoke to her she opened her eyes, and in spite of the visuals that my eyes were seeing she somehow still managed to look strong. 

I showed her photos and movies of her grand children, and talked to her for a long time.

I thanked her for having the courage to leave her motherland and afford me the opportunity to grow as an American.

When she was being extubated, a young woman came into the room with a guitar and played and sang the haunting free prose of Guajira Guantanamera (The peasant girl from Guantanamo); a most fitting song, since my mother was from Guantanamo, and she came from strong Cuban peasant stock.

"Guajira pero fina (A peasant, but a very refined woman)", noted a neighbor and loving caretaker. 

The song, which can start with just about any prose, started with the Jose Marti poem:
 Yo quiero, cuando me muerasin patria, pero sin amo, tener en mi tumba un ramo de flores y una bandera
I want to, when I die, without my motherland, but without a master, to have on my tomb a bunch of flowers and a flag.
She died without a master, a strong and pliable woman who not only gave me the gift of life, but also the gift of freedom.

And as my mother died in her sleep in the early hours of the morning, in the capital city of the bitter Cuban Diaspora, all that I could gather to say to her was mostly the same that I said to my father when he passed last year: "Thank you for your courage... from me, and from my children... and soon from their children. You opened a whole new world for them."

I love you Mami... Un Abrazo Fuerte! Thank you for your gifts to me and my children, and happy birthday in Heaven!

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4 June 2020, 3:30 am 563a775c28386f0591a65bb95a880f3d