ArsRSS Calls and Opportunities http://net18reaching.org/artrss/ Current Term Specific News Feed en-us Tue, 24 Nov 2020 03:00:02 -0600 240 <![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

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31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

]]>
1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

]]>
31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

]]>
28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

]]>
26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

]]>
23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

]]>
1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

]]>
31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

]]>
28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

]]>
26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

]]>
23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

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1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

]]>
31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

]]>
28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

]]>
26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

]]>
23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

]]>
1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

]]>
31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

]]>
28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

]]>
26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

]]>
23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

]]>
1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

]]>
31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

]]>
28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

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26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

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23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

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31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

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1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

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426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

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<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

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<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

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<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

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bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

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d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

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c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

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4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

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3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

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eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

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2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

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1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

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31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

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28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

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26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

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23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

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31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

]]>
1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

]]>
31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

]]>
28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

]]>
26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

]]>
23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

]]>
1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

]]>
31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

]]>
28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

]]>
26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

]]>
23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

]]>
1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

]]>
31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

]]>
28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

]]>
26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

]]>
23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

]]>
1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

]]>
31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

]]>
28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

]]>
26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

]]>
23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

]]>
1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

]]>
31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

]]>
28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

]]>
26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

]]>
23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

]]>
1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

]]>
31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

]]>
28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

]]>
26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

]]>
23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

]]>
1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

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31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

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28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

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26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

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23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

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31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

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1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

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426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

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0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

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d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

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03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

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bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

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d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

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c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

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4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

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3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

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2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

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1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

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31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

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28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

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26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

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23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

]]>
1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

]]>
31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

]]>
28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

]]>
26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

]]>
23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492
<![CDATA[Burgers at the Laundromat]]> Found: opportunity
ZelwiesBurger.jpg
Juliane Zelwies, Hamburger Diagram


Saturday, August 8th, the Laundromat kicks off its 2009 season with The Burger Group Show – a one-day exhibition complete with selections from The Laundromat Flat File and a menu of 'conceptual burgers.' The show features work by returning Laundromat artists, as well as newcomers who will be exhibiting their work with the space this fall.

Each participating artist has crafted a 'conceptual hamburger' that references the study of art history, or art-related concepts. The artists will be writing descriptions of their respective burgers for the menu, and cooking their creations for patrons. Founder and director of the Laundromat, Kevin Andrew Curran, sees the menu as a "tongue-in-cheek" opportunity for the artists to make commentary and fuel artistic discourse.

Curran does not intend to teach visitors a formal lesson, but he does see the potential for artists and visitors alike to indulge in "some (serious) fun with the idea of creating and consuming hamburgers that are playfully engaging art history." The show also provides an opportunity for the Laundromat to display works from the space's rotating Flat File. Artists included in the File lend their work to the Laundromat for one year, after which the drawer may be offered to another artist. In this way, Curran hopes to increase the number of artists whose work may be viewed in the flat file, while simultaneously increasing the geographic diversity of the collection.

The Burger Group Show will be held at the Laundromat gallery on Saturday, August 8th, from 6-10 PM. Participating artists include Chris Deo, Sarah McDougald Kohn, Maria Walker, Jonathan Allmaier, Scott Wilson, Ben Godward, Joe Protheroe, Ianthe Jackson and Liz Atzberger. Conceptual burgers will be on sale for $5 to $20, and visitors are invited to take home a copy of the menu.

]]>
31 July 2009, 3:50 pm ffa978d63a305009fc59b23969410e3e
<![CDATA[Kathleen Cullen on "Tattoo"]]> Found: opportunity
NYC6 017.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.


Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts is a multimedia exploration of tattoo art and its ever-changing role in society. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, sculpture and film, as well as a few empty bottles of Jack Daniels littered about the gallery for an something like an authentic, tattoo parlor feel. We caught up with Cullen, the director of the gallery, and asked about her inspiration for the show and her take on tattoo art.-- S.K.

Stephanie Korszen for ArtCat: What was your inspiration for situating the work of tattoo artists within the context of a fine art gallery?

Kathleen Cullen: The inspiration is really the everyday. You need only sit down at a café or bar, or stand at a traffic light, to grant your eyes the opportunity to admire the body art on others' skin. Additionally, one of the artists I represent, Max Snow, served as the catalyst for this exhibition. In 2008, Max documented the stories of Latino gang members in L.A., for whom tattoo art serves an important role in self-identity. Max also wears part of his identity externally in the form of body art.

In the 1930s, Herbert Hoffmann photographed people and documented their fantastic stories before they were sent to prison by the Third Reich. He developed a great respect for these people, whom he saw as hard-working and unpretentious. Many bore the simplest of tattoos on their arms and hands – historically a sign of degeneracy. Over the years, tattoos have broken free of this inherent link to all things degenerate, to the point where they now have the potential to serve as a status symbol on par with designer handbags. Bruce Willis, on the cover of W Magazine, sports tattoos. Supermodels adorn themselves with body art. We see biker motifs, as well as Maori, Japanese, and sailor themes – rich codes to decipher on other’s bodies.

AC: You’ve discussed tattoo art as an intercession between the arenas of popular and high culture. How have you mirrored this comingling of cultures in your gallery space?

KC: We have everything from a Keith Haring poster, graffiti tattoos, tattoo-inspired furniture
and a film, Mark of Cain, by Alix Lambert. This film was part of a ten-year project during which the Lambert interviewed criminals in Russia. Lambert’s project inspired David Cronenberg to review the Russian criminal tattoo codes for the well-known movie Eastern Promises, starring Vigo Mortensen and Naomi Watts. Lambert reveals the hidden history behind Russian tattoos, as well as their complex symbolism.

NYC6 030.jpg
Installation view of Tattoo at Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts. Via gallery.

AC: How did you conduct your research for this exhibition?

KC: We began by researching books and articles on the tattoo subculture from the 1930s
through the 1950s, and then followed the evolution of the tattoo further into the punk generation of the 1970s and 80s. Tattoos have transcended their stereotypical role as the mark of a lowlife in the first half of the twentieth century – though youthful sailors often flaunted tattoos as a rite of manhood – to arrive at a socially-accepted norm. Represented in our exhibit are biker, Maori, Japanese and sailor motifs.

Also included is Larry Clark's Tulsa tattoo. Like Danny Lyons, Clark blurred the lines between observer and participant. Lyons photographed unwanted, hated bikers. A common underlying theme for the artists represented in the exhibition is the desire to share an emotional closeness with their subjects. The resulting works are not merely documents; they are empathetic portraits.

AC: In presenting tattoo art, all of the works on display also portray the tattooed. Do you feel that the meaning of a tattoo is inherently tied to – and thus dependent upon – the individual’s identity?

KC: The meaning of a tattoo is intrinsically tied to a person's identity, because without the individual, the tattoo is rendered meaningless. If the individual was done away with, the tattoo would become an image devoid of significance.

]]>
1 July 2009, 6:49 pm cf0b5f5faeee9b9e077896d92db0abdf
<![CDATA[Oil Painters of America 30th National Juried Exhibition - Escondido, CA]]> Found: deadline
$100,000 in cash and merchandise. Deadline: Jan 22, 2021

]]>
426aea7ed790eab085d4cbd5e5e4cddc
<![CDATA[LENS 2021 National Juried Photography Exhibition - Evanston, IL]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$650 in awards. Deadline: Jan 11, 2021

]]>
0686e9c30794da34addf2afbfd540b5d
<![CDATA[Portrait Artist of 2021 - Virtual Competition]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,800 in awards. Deadline: Jan 9, 2021

]]>
d1ebaab56ede4d63c979084ed409719e
<![CDATA[MetLife Workforce Mural Contest]]> Found: deadline
Public display at MetLife Stadium. Deadline: Dec 14, 2020

]]>
03ff1d40b506783920841ae18704c380
<![CDATA[East Lansing Art Festival - East Lansing, MI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
~$6,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
bc6446cc9119ad7725aec85843ee3ff0
<![CDATA[2021 Midwest Center for Photography Juried Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 31, 2021

]]>
d8d7cee0896b74ea4f7944376982b6e0
<![CDATA[2021 Georgia Watercolor Society National Exhibition - Carrolton, GA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
Over $10,000 in anticipated awards. Deadline: Jan 18, 2021

]]>
c4b61f8084f1502d302806f95bf89839
<![CDATA[Louisiana Watercolor Society 51st International Exhibition - Online]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$8,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 26, 2021

]]>
4eceafcf3fa5f24c3218e822f17b01c2
<![CDATA[2021 Bryn Du Art Show - Granville, OH]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,000 in awards. Deadline: Jan 15, 2021

]]>
3073ff275a5476d876124018f7c53840
<![CDATA[Mark Arts Oil Painting National Exhibition - Wichita, KS]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$3,000 in awards. Deadline: Dec 8, 2020

]]>
eaed770f299b36d1fd53670f8c551dc8
<![CDATA[Calls for Entry: HoCo Open]]> Found: submissions, submission, entry, entr

 All Howard County artists are invited to participate in HoCo Open 2021, HCAC’s annual, non-juried exhibit showcasing local artists. In lieu of a one-day drop-off, entries will be accepted online beginning November 5th on a first-come basis, one entry per artist, until 100 submissions have been received. The drop-off dates for the exhibit are December 17 & 18. Accepted artists will be provided with instructions for scheduling a specific time to drop off their artwork at the Center for the Arts.HoCo Open will be on display from January 9 – February 20, 2021. For the full prospectus and to apply, visit their website.

]]>
2 November 2020, 4:50 pm cce1bb9450ee5c4caa8fbd1e21a2af79
<![CDATA[Now Open: Artist Applications for the 2021 Festival]]> Found: opportunity

Let's go back to normal in 2021! Apply for the annual Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival.

Now in its 30th year, the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival has a long-standing reputation for showcasing high quality, hand-crafted, one-of-a-kind artwork in a dynamic outdoor setting. The Festival provides an opportunity to engage directly with exceptional artists, as juried in by leading art practitioners and artists in the visual arts field, that meet a high level of artistic standards. This unique open-air event is presented in Reston Town Center and attracts affluent patrons and knowledgeable collectors from the Washington, DC metropolitan region and beyond. 

This year, the 2021 Festival will implement new health and safety adaptations for the care and consideration of all. 

Artist applications are accepted through ZAPPlication through December 27, 2020

]]>
1 November 2020, 4:58 pm af8b814312c6db3564282b95df49ee36
<![CDATA[2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Grant]]> Found: opportunity, deadline, submit, jury

 Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) is pleased to announce the 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant opportunity for mid-career artists.  The purpose of this grant, established by San Francisco-based jewelry collector Susan Beech, is to recognize a mid-career artist who has made a substantial contribution to the field and to provide resources to develop and implement a significant jewelry-related project that the artist would not otherwise have the ability to undertake.

The 2021 Susan Beech Mid-Career Artist Grant is open to makers between the ages of 35 and 55 at the time of the proposal deadline, and must have an active and ongoing record of activity in the field. 

The proposed project should be about jewelry, loosely defined. There must be a specific outcome to the project, and it must be completed within a two-year time frame. Examples could include (but are not limited to) creation of a new body of work; a book, catalog, or other publication; research and development (including travel study); performance art involving jewelry; or an educational/social initiative involving jewelry. A proposed budget must be included as part of the proposal. 

A proposal that was previously submitted may be submitted again.

The grant recipient will receive a cash grant of $20,000, to be paid over the two years in which the project will be implemented.

Grant proposals must include:

  • A biography of the artist 
  • A project proposal outlining the project, including an explanation of how the grant will help support the artist’s work and career and enhance the field  
  • A detailed budget 
  • A project proposal portfolio of five - ten images that support/define/clarify the project proposal 

The jury of distinguished professionals for this grant cycle will be: grant founder and collector Susan Beech (United States); internationally recognized maker and educator, Daniel Kruger (Germany); and curator of jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Emily Stoehrer (United States). 

The deadline to apply is midnight, MST (Denver, CO, USA), on January 10, 2021. More information and complete guidelines can be found at www.artjewelryforum.org.

]]>
31 October 2020, 5:03 pm 58d0bac21358de38b26ac2b02e427b1b
<![CDATA[UNDER $500 Call for Entry]]> Found: deadline, entry, entr

CALL FOR ENTRY!
UNDER $500

DeadlineNovember 13, 2020


Full Prospectus and Application HERE

Have your work noticed and purchased by local buyers & collectors, just in time for the holidays! Maryland Art Place (MAP) is seeking artists for “UNDER $500”, our upcoming winter benefit exhibition. Artworks will be exhibited at MAP Saturday, December 12, and Sunday, December 13, 2020, for a first-come-first-serve, ticketed, a two-day event that will promote the sale of artwork by artists in the Maryland region. Artwork will then be featured ONLINE – for a virtual sale running Tuesday, December 15 – Saturday, December 19. Event Details to follow.

The exhibition will include approximately 1-3 works by each artist (scale dependent – in the case of smaller works more than 3 pieces may be accepted). Each individual piece will retail for $500 or less. Participating artists will receive one free ticket to the event. Artists who plan to attend must RSVP, please email Caitlin@mdartplace.org to reserve your spot!  Selected artists will be issued an UNDER $500 profile form to fill out inquiring anecdotal information to help better engage patrons with the artists and their work. UNDER $500 is MAP’s winter benefit. Proceeds from the sale of artwork will be split 50/50 between Maryland Art Place and the artist.

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28 October 2020, 5:08 pm 6ee37692ffd9d96b97673758f5919d0e
<![CDATA[Paint It! Ellicott City 2020 – Open Paint-Out Artists Wanted!]]> Found: opportunity, submit

 Paint-Out in Historic Ellicott City: October 15-18

Be a part of the Paint It! Ellicott City Open Paint-Out! Grab your painting gear and head to Historic Ellicott City to paint alongside our juried artists during our annual plein air event. In lieu of our temporary community exhibit, this year we will be hosting an online exhibit of Open Paint artwork as well as promoting photos of the event/artwork on social media. Artists will have the opportunity to submit their photos to be shared. For more details and to register for free, click here.

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26 September 2020, 4:57 pm 2458d471d2c61d9f4273332923e18f90
<![CDATA[The curious case of predicting a juror's choice]]> Found: submit, juror, entr

As mentioned here, the McLean Center for the Arts sponsors a very good painting competition every couple of years called "Strictly Painting." 

A few years ago, around 1999 or 2000, the juror for that year's version of "Strictly Painting" was Terrie Sultan, who back then was the Curator for Contemporary Art at the Corcoran. 

I thought that this choice was a little odd, as Ms. Sultan, in my opinion then, was not "painting-friendly." 

In fact, with all due respect, back then I even blamed her for diminishing the great Corcoran Biennials, which used to be known at one point as the Corcoran Biennial of Painting. As such, they were essentially the only well-known Biennial left in the nation that was strictly designed to get a look at the state of contemporary painting, which was somehow surviving its so called "death." 

It was Ms. Sultan who decided to "expand" the Biennial and make it just like all other Biennials: Jack of all trades (genres) Biennials. In the process, depending on what side of this argument you're on, she (a) did a great service to the Corcoran by moving it into the center of the "genre of the moment" scene - like all other Biennials, or (b) gave away the uniqueness of the nation's top painting Biennial title. 

Even decades later, and with the Corcoran all but a memory, I'm aligned with the minority who supports camp (b) but understand those who defend her decision to become just another player in camp (a). 

Most people think that her decision and drive were the right thing to do in order to bring the Corcoran to a world stage, but clearly it didn't work, since the Corcoran has since folded.

But I digress. 

When she was announced as the juror, I decided to see if I could predict her painting selectivity, sensitivity, process, and agenda. It was my thesis that I could predict what Ms. Sultan would pick. So I made a bet, and decided to enter the exhibition with work created specifically to fit what I deduced would be agreeable to Ms. Sultan's tastes. 

I felt that I could guarantee that I would get into the show because of the transparency of the juror's personal artistic agenda. It is her right to have one; I have them, in fact, we all have them. 

I was trained as a painter at the University of Washington School of Art, but around 1992 or so, I stopped painting and decided to devote myself strictly to my love for drawing. 

So I had not picked up a brush in several years when I decided to enter this 1999 competition, designed to survey the state of painting in our region. It was my theory that Ms. Sultan would not be in the representational side of painting. It was also clear that she (like many curators) was seduced by technology in the form of videos, digital stuff, and such trendy things in the then novel Internet era. 

And so I decided to see if I could marry digital stuff with painting. 

And what I did was the following: I took some of my old Navy ribbons, and scanned them in to get a digital file. I then blew them up so that the final image was quite pixilated. I then printed about five of them and took slides of the printed sheets of paper. I then submitted these slides to the competition, but identified them as oil on canvas paintings. My plan was that if accepted, how hard could it be to whip up a couple of paintings after the fact? 

I titled them with such titles as Digitalism: National Defense and Digitalism: Expeditionary Medal and so on. 

From what I was later told, several hundred painters submitted work. 

And Ms. Sultan selected about only about seven or eight painters in total. And not only was I one of them, but she picked two of my entries. 

I was elated! I had hit the nail right on the head! 

I felt so superior in having such an insight into this intelligent woman's intellect that I (a painter no more) could create competition-specific work to get accepted into this highly regarded show. And then I began the task of creating the two paintings, using the pixilated images as the guide. 

And it turned out to be a lot harder than I thought. For one thing, I had submitted the "paintings" in quite a large size; each painting was supposed to be six feet long. And it didn't take me long to discover that there are a lot of color nuances and hues in an average pixilated image. And I went through dozens and dozens of rolls of tape as I pulled off the old Washington Color School trick of taping stripes (in my case small one inch square boxes of individual colors - hundreds upon hundreds of them) in a precise sequence to prevent smudging and color peeling, etc. 

I painted for at least six hours every day, switching off between paintings to allow the previous day's work to dry off enough to allow a new layer of tape to be applied. I did all the varnishing outside, which usually attracted all the small neighborhood ruffians. It was incredibly hard work, and I was ever so sorry that I had even gotten this crazy idea. All my nights were consumed. Expeditionary Medal, oil on canvasBut eventually they were finished and delivered to MPA and Ms. Sultan even wrote some very nice things about them in the exhibition's catalog. 


Me? 

I was in a mix of both vindication and guilt; exhausted but fired up with the often wrong sense of righteousness of the self-righteous. After the show, I had no idea what to do with them, and they didn't fit my "body of works," but I ended up selling both of them through Sotheby's

And today, some art collector in South Carolina and another one in Canada, each have one very large, exhausting and handsome oil painting of pixilated naval ribbons hanging in their home, in happy ignorance of the interesting story behind them. 

I mentioned the adjective handsome in describing them, because a few years ago I was telling this story to Prof. John Winslow, who asked to see the images of the real paintings. When I showed him, he said that they were actually "quite handsome paintings." 

I had never had my work described as "handsome" (although the Washington Post once described it as "irritating"), so it stuck in my head. So there you have it: The story of a former painter with a point to prove about a local curator, the subsequent hard-labor punishment of the process, and a hidden story behind two handsome paintings.

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23 September 2020, 4:00 am b535d868a25e3d2a2273c72211309492