ArsRSS Calls and Opportunities http://net18reaching.org/artrss/ Current Term Specific News Feed en-us Sat, 24 Feb 2024 03:00:02 -0600 240 <![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

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24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

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24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

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15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

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23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

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10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


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9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

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24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

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24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

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15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

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23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

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19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

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10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


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9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

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24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

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24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


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9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

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15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

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d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


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9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

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24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

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10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

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24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


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9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

]]>
24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

]]>
15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

]]>
10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


]]>
9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.

I have seen $80,000 worth of sculptures sell to one collector in Bethesda and a painter with a price point of $17,000 sell out in Reston.

Do not let the snobby attitude of the high art world affect your preconception of what these two street art fairs are like; go visit one this coming (and hopefully post Covidian) and open your eyes. In 2021 the fairs slipped from May to later months… but I am sure that they’ll be back to May in 2022.

And because of them, and because of the success of Art Basel Miami Beach, we know that given a certain critical mass, people will come out to an art fair. The primary key for art dealers to have interest in an art fair is sales (and also exposure to new collectors, museum curators, etc.), but mainly sales.

If you are a British gallery, by the time you get yourself and your artwork to Miami Beach, you're in the hole a whole bunch of Euros and British pounds; if you don't sell anything (like it happened to a British gallery in artDC and an Israeli gallery at another fair), chances are that you won't return to that fair.

But increase the public attendance numbers exponentially, and Economics 101 tells you that sales will also increase exponentially. And unlike the hotel-deprived artDC location at the Convention Center, I am told by DC's tourist gurus that the National Mall is already a magnet location where visitors, regardless of where they are staying around the Greater DC region, flock to during their visits to the capital.

Since two major Greater DC area street art fairs already exist in May in the Greater DC area, we can even consider aligning the weekends so that both Reston, Bethesda, and the Smithsonian American International Art Fair all take place on the same weekend!

Offer free bus service between Reston and Bethesda and the National Mall for collectors to hop around during the fair weekend, and a public buzz alignment will begin to happen. The Smithsonian American International Art Fair starts on a Thursday through Sunday and both Reston and Bethesda continue to run on Saturday and Sunday. And the Smithsonian American International Art Fair is focused as a major fundraiser for the cash-hungry SI.

A formula of booth prices + perhaps a 5% commission on all sales (both tax deductible for American galleries) would take care of temporary Mall booth construction, re-seeding of grass, and booth construction inside SI venues and still yield a nice chunk of cash for the SI.

If there's commercial success and high public attendance, soon we'd see some satellite hotel fairs popping up all over DC and its easy-to-get-to suburbs; the Phillips will jump on the bandwagon right away.

ABMB had 26 fairs all over Greater Miami last December. Another DC-unique element to the above model, and an important element that only a Washington art fair weekend can add: include the Embassies!

In addition to all the above events taking place, the fair could also align with shows at 15-20 embassy galleries around DC. The embassies would showcase one (or a group) of their national artists, and then the fair would really have an international flavor, and the beginning seeds of an American Venice in the DMV.

DC is a small city; it's fairly easy to set up transportation between the embassies and the Mall. In fact, some embassies could probably set that up themselves.

I think that this "new" super model could (and eventually when someone delivers and implements it -- it will) challenge Miami Beach -- and yes, I am aware that DC in May is not Miami in December -- but I also think that the District's own museums and public attractions trump Miami's anytime, so the DMV has something different to offer the potential collector who may be considering attending a new art fair in a city (like DC) that also offers him/her some other cultural and visual attractions besides good weather, and nice beaches… and Calle Ocho.

DC art commissioners... Smithsonianos... DC city fathers and mothers.... call me!

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24 January 2024, 1:04 am 911d2ea7ed2f3c1a353f26c834dd6076
<![CDATA[Bethesda Painting Awards]]> Found: submissions, submission, deadline, submit, awarded, awards, award, juror, entry, entr

The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District invites local artists to submit work to the 20th annual Bethesda Painting Awards. This juried art competition awards $14,000 in prizes to four selected winners. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, February 27, 2024. Up to eight finalists will be chosen to display their work at Bethesda’s Gallery B in June 2024.

 

A panel of esteemed jurors, including Virginia Anderson, Department Head of American Painting & Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Baltimore Museum of Art; Scott Hutchison, Associate Professor of Practice in painting and drawing at Georgetown University; and Nicole Santiago, Professor of Art at the College of William and Mary and the 2023 Bethesda Painting Awards Best in Show Winner, will curate the competition.

 

The first-place winner will be awarded $10,000; second place will be honored with $2,000 and third place will be awarded $1,000.  A “young” artist whose birth date is after February 28, 1994 may also be awarded $1,000.

 

Artists can apply online or download an application online. For information on the Bethesda Painting Awards, visit www.bethesda.org or call 301-215-6660.

 

Participation is open to artists aged 18 and above, residing in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, D.C. The competition welcomes original 2-D paintings, spanning various mediums such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, encaustic, and mixed media. The maximum dimension should not exceed 60 inches in width or 84 inches in height. No reproductions. Artwork must have been completed within the last two years and must be available for the duration of the exhibition. Selected artists must deliver their artwork to the exhibit site in Bethesda, MD. Each artist must submit five images, an application and a non-refundable entry fee of $25.


The Bethesda Painting Awards was established by local business owner Carol Trawick in 2005. Ms. Trawick has served as a community activist for more than 25 years in downtown Bethesda and established The Jim and Carol Trawick Foundation in 2007. She is the former Chair of the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, past Chair of the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. and founder of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards.

 

 

Best in Show winners include:

2023  Nicole Santiago, Williamsburg, VA

2022  Andrew Hladky, Kensington, MD

2021  Megan Lewis, Baltimore, MD

2020  Lawrence Cromwell, Baltimore, MD

2019  Mary Anne Arntzen, Baltimore, MD

2018 Carolyn Case, Cockeysville, MD

2017 Katherine Tzu-Lan Mann, Washington, D.C.

2016 Tanja Softic, Richmond, VA

2015 Bill Schmidt, Baltimore, MD

2014 Kyle Hackett, Baltimore, MD

2013 Barry Nemett, Stevenson, MD

2012 Ali Miller, Baltimore, MD

2011 Alison Hall, Roanoke, VA

2010 Nora Sturges, Baltimore, MD

2009 Camilo Sanin, Jessup, MD

2008 B.G. Muhn, North Potomac, MD

2007 Matthew Klos, Baltimore, MD

2006 Tony Shore, Baltimore, MD

2005 Joe Kabriel, Annapolis, MD

 

From award-winning theatre to independent films, downtown Bethesda’s Arts & Entertainment District is filled with inspiring artists and art venues. The Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District is managed by the Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc., and is the producer of The Trawick Prize: Bethesda Contemporary Art Awards, Bethesda Painting Awards, Bethesda Fine Arts Festival, Bethesda Film Fest and Play In A Day.

 

Established by Montgomery County in 1994, Bethesda Urban Partnership, Inc. (BUP) is a downtown management organization that markets and maintains downtown Bethesda. The BUP team works in marketing, maintenance, transportation and administration to produce cultural events and community festivals and attend to landscaping and maintenance needs. BUP also manages Bethesda Transportation Solutions (BTS), the Bethesda Arts & Entertainment District, and the Bethesda Circulator as well as the non-profit art spaces, Gallery B, Studio B and Triangle Art Studios. For a closer look, please visit www.bethesda.org.

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15 January 2024, 1:34 am 46b5920eddf76ff6345d379e1dac94c7
<![CDATA[Sculpture Walk 2024/25 - Pentwater, MI]]> Found: deadline, award
$3,000 honorarium + Best of Show + possible Purchase Award. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
d5f424f22a0c4c9fec755ec214eac852
<![CDATA[58th Annual Juried Regional Exhibition - Richardson, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$6,000+ in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
1c308a38c7894de4081975fec4f585fc
<![CDATA[Lodi Community Art Center 62nd Annual Spring Show - Acampo, CA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,950 in awards. Deadline: Mar 10, 2024

]]>
70f2e623d48f47a71c671faabbefbc65
<![CDATA[VAA 40th Juried Open Exhibition - Houston, TX]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$2,400+ in awards. Deadline: Feb 26, 2024

]]>
ed21cfc7648081bbec453e9ea4b1fa3f
<![CDATA[2024 NCOA Photography Award Contest: Aging Well for All - Fairfax, VA]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$5,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
4e609bec634eadae1f59f0c191feab34
<![CDATA['Unique by Nature' Juried Art Show - McKinney, TX]]> Found: deadline
$6,000 Purchase Prize. Deadline: Mar 15, 2024

]]>
b367bee92e8012c557c1cd18dcbfae9d
<![CDATA[12th Annual BAAC National Juried Exhibition - Batesville, AR]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards + solo exhibit + $500 purchase. Deadline: Mar 11, 2024

]]>
532c47c5e9e8c006d45ce983ea7082fc
<![CDATA[Alive in the Arts Juried Show - Plymouth, WI]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
$1,000 in awards. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cc0ddb8c97b12167efe2cb226d8dc277
<![CDATA[Eclipse themed mural - Vincennes, IN]]> Found: deadline
$2,500 commission. Deadline: Mar 8, 2024

]]>
cb06a2370c655c6caf5301960283a3de
<![CDATA[Lab Art Prize - Venice, Italy]]> Found: deadline, awards, award
5000,00 EUR in awards. Deadline: Mar 7, 2024

]]>
d50946b718baadee9edd3dc178287f91
<![CDATA[Rejected!]]> Found: submissions, submission, submit

 Once again... thick skin ops!

Thank you for submitting artwork to Open Call for Washington Project For the Arts’ Collectors' Night 2024 Benefit Auction! We received over 250 submissions and appreciate your effort and interest in participating. We regret to inform you that we did not select your work for inclusion in the auction this year.

We hope you will stay connected by signing up for our e-newsletter or following us on Instagram if you haven't already. We post opportunities throughout the year including an Open Call for project ideas later in the fall. 

Please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Thanks again for submitting, and we wish you the very best!

Sincerely,

Emily Fussner

Events Manager & Resident Designer

WASHINGTON PROJECT FOR THE ARTS

2124 8th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

wpadc.org | @wpadc

]]>
23 February 2024, 2:24 pm 89334e48781195f30fde8ce74408f15d
<![CDATA[New Documentary on Artist Jacob Kainen]]> Found: award

The Jacob Kainen Art Trust has enlisted the award-winning director Mark Covino (A Band Called Death, The Crest), and producer Jon Gann (Miss Alma Thomas: A Life in Color, Karen Carpenter: Starving for Perfection) to create a short documentary exploring the life and art of Jacob Kainen (1909-2001), one of the most influential artists of the 20th century.

“Jacob Kainen: An Artists’ Artist” follows the life of Kainen, a prolific but often overlooked artist of 20th Century America. From his immigrant upbringing to his rebellious artistic journey in NYC, his leftist ideologies and eventual impact on the D.C. art scene, Kainen’s story is one of perseverance and passion.

Despite facing challenges like McCarthyism and career limitations, he found solace in his art, especially with the support of his second wife, Ruth. His legacy as an artist’s artist and influential mentor endures, shaping generations of artists to come.

Jacob was not only a beloved painter and printmaker, but also as a curator, mentor, teacher, and a major force in developing the post-war Washington, D.C. art scene. His work is featured in major museum collections, including the National Gallery of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Narrated in Kainen’s own voice, unearthed from a treasure trove of recently discovered tapes, the film promises an intimate portrayal of the artist's tumultuous journey. His story will be further explored by curators Jonathan F. Walz (The Columbus Museum) and Seth Feman (Frist Art Museum), alongside perspectives from prominent art historians, artists, and Kainen’s own son, Dan Kainen, audiences will be immersed in the rich tapestry of Kainen’s life and artistry.

While the initial funds have been secured, the project seeks additional support to license archival materials, ensuring the preservation of Kainen’s legacy for posterity. Every contribution paves the way for a deeper understanding of Kainen’s impact on the art world and his influence on future generations of artists.

“Kainen’s role in shaping American modernism, particularly in Washington, D.C., is a narrative long overdue for exploration. This documentary serves as a vital conduit for a new generation of art enthusiasts and historians to rediscover his profound contributions,” remarks Jonathan F. Walz, curator at The Columbus Museum.

More information on the project is online at www.jacobkainen.com/donate

]]>
19 February 2024, 7:46 pm d3d7e6450caea53d5db0a1d7a8cc0819
<![CDATA[Opportunity for Miniature artists: show at a New York City art fair!]]> Found: opportunity, submit, jurying, jury, entry, entr

Bottom Line Up Front: An opportunity for DMV area miniature artists to have their work curated into a world-class art fair in New York City this coming Fall.

Summary: I have been retained by Ramsay Fairs, a British-based art fair empire that runs art fairs in the United States, Asia and Europe to curate a wall of miniature art to be exhibited and sold at the Affordable Art Fair New York City this coming Fall.

Ramsay Fairs is one of the biggest art fair organisers globally, running 19 fairs a year with over ¼ million visitors. Through a portfolio of art fairs that includes Affordable Art Fair, VOLTA and British Art Fair, we inspire people to collect and enjoy art at every level. 
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC
Preview Night of the 2023 Affordable Art Fair NYC

Definition of miniature art: I am educated by this Council for the Arts website that a: 

"commonly accepted American guideline among many of today's miniaturists is that subjects do not exceed one-sixth their natural size. Exceptions are permitted for abstractions or tiny subjects not lending themselves to the "one-sixth" application provided they Embrace the delicate essence and spirit of miniaturism."

Our own Miniature Painters, Sculptors & Gravers Society of Washington, D.C. (MPSGS), which has been around since 1931 adds:

This unique art form, based on a minute scale, traces its roots back to the book paintings and illuminated manuscripts set in the 7th century. A work of fine art in miniature is a particularly personal object that draws the viewer into an intimate, concentrated little world that is breathtaking in its execution. Every single detail is miniaturized -- the scale of the subject matter, the brush or pencil strokes -- so that only with high magnification can one behold the immaculate details of the artist's technique which may include stippling, hatching, or pointillism. These techniques are a specialized means of producing a perfect balance of color and detail in a series of thinly applied layers of exquisite color intended to reflect light. The miniatures show a high standard of design and the artist's mastery of the chosen media and palette.

For this exhibition, no 2D framed work shall be larger (including frame) that 8x10 5x7 inches and any 3D work cannot be longer than six (6) inches in any direction.

I plan to have two rounds of jurying:

1. Initially I will selecting semi-finalists from digital images - either emailed to me, or available online once a link is provided. Each artist can submit up to three works for consideration.

2. I will then review all round one selected artworks for in-person review of the actual work to ensure that the actual artwork meets professional presentation standards as demanded by the art fair guidelines.

3. This round two review will be done at a local art gallery or space (to be announced later) with ease of access and parking, etc. This means that the work will have to be brought in - not shipped for this round of final review.

At this point I will sign for and keep all selected works and pack them for transportation to the fair. Each work will be identified by:

  • Artist's name
  • Title of work
  • Media
  • Year
  • Price
All work must be for sale.  50% of all sale proceeds will go the artist and the remaining 50% will go to a local New York City charity to be selected by the art fair staff at a later date.

Cost to enter the process: Free

Selected work will be driven to the fair by me, installed by me at the fair, and all sales will be run by the gallery at the fair.  Artists will be paid within a week after the fair and provided with the full contact details of the purchaser.

Unsold works will be returned at a selected date after the fair, and must be picked up in person; there will be no shipping back to artist options.

More later... I will design and upload an entry form which artists can use as a reference once the delivery/pick-up locations have been solidified; meanwhile if you have any questions, please send me an email to lennycampello@hotmail.com

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10 February 2024, 2:31 pm 163b6009a40d9e398402749cfb3bdf89
<![CDATA[REJECTED! Shot down!]]> Found: opportunity, residency, submission

I applied to become a mentor/consulting artist in my own county - and just got rejected!

Another example of why artists need to have thick skins! 

How do I feel? I wish whoever they picked 1000% congrats and a load of success!

Parts of me do wonder... cough... cough...

From: Flannery Winchester Flannery.Winchester@creativemoco.com

Fri 2/9/2024 2:06 PM

Dear Florencio,

On behalf of AHCMC, we would like to thank you very much for your submission to our Request for Qualifications for the Consulting Artist position. While our selection committee appreciated the opportunity to learn more about your artistic practice and were impressed with your credentials, your application was regrettably not selected for this position. 

We hope to have the opportunity to collaborate with you on future public art projects in Montgomery County. 

Thank you for your time and efforts during this process. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let me know. 

Warmly,

Flannery




Flannery Winchester

Public Art Program Manager

 

1511361269793_image002.png


801 ellsworth drive, silver spring, md 20910-4438

 

Arts & Humanities Council | Blog |  Twitter | CultureSpotMC| Facebook | MontgomeryTraditions


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9 February 2024, 3:55 pm bd5332a3725af79971f20b76e0032105
<![CDATA[Ooooh... there may be an art fair coming to Washington, DC]]> Found: opportunity, juror, entr

Not yet... but the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities is thinking about one -- I've volunteered to assist them... so far been ghosted.

As you may know, we've been hosting a series of community stakeholder meetings discussing the potential of bringing an international art fair/festival to Washington DC in 2025. We want to meet with individual artists from the community to discuss this opportunity and how it might impact their livelihood and their art.

Our next Art Week 2025 Community Stakeholder Meeting will be held at the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) on February 1st from 6 to 8 pm.

There is very limited space for this meeting. Please RSVP to secure a spot. There will be a few spots left for walk-ups but we cannot exceed our event capacity. If you have attended a stakeholder meeting in the past please let someone else get a chance to RSVP.

Join us from 6 to 8 pm on Tuesday, February 1 at the Thurgood Marshall Center.

I first proposed a slightly different version of the following art fair model to all the organizations mentioned in this article about a decade ago, when there was (even then) a sense of art fatigue brewing in the art world. Result: zip, nada, nothing! No one even answered my letters (remember letters?).

In a post Covidian world, I suspect that a lot of people will still be a little leery of large group gatherings, and art fairs based on pre-Covidian standards may be a bit antiquated in the Brave Chickenized New World.

Herewith a revised Campello Art Fair Model.

The important thing to remember, as I mull, chew, and refine a "new" art post-Covidian fair model to replace the existing pre-Covidian art fair model, which in its American incarnations seemed to work well only in Miami and New York, but not so well in the West coast (and as we DMV-based folks have seen with (e)merge and artDC, not at all in the capital region), is the marriage of a legitimate art entity (a museum) with an art-for-sale process as a means to raise funds.

The seeds for this model already exist in the DC region with the Smithsonian Craft Show, now in its third decade.

Considered by many to be the finest craft fair in the world -- and from the many artists that I have spoken to over the years -- one of the best places to sell fine crafts as well, this prestigious and highly competitive juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American craft usually takes place each April for four days. It takes place at the National Building Museum in Washington, DC and it includes one-of-a-kind and limited-edition craft objects in 12 different media: basketry, ceramics, decorative fiber, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper, wearable art and wood.

There were 120 exhibitors in their last show, including emerging artists and master craftsmen, over 30 of whom were first-time participants. Twelve of those selected were also first-time applicants to the show. All were chosen by a panel of expert jurors from a highly competitive field of close to 1,400 applicants.

So, we have a model for crafts in DC which has been working for over 30 years.

See where I'm going?

Can we envision the Smithsonian American Art Fair?

Or... The Smithsonian American International Art Fair?

The SAIAF would dramatically expand the business model of the Smithsonian Craft Fair to a National Mall-wide - outdoors - or even a citywide art fair anchored and guided by the Smithsonian Institution, and possibly either:

(a) spread throughout the various accommodating outdoor spaces at the various SI locales around the National Mall or even…

(b) in temporary art spaces, booth, or containers on the open spaces of the National Mall itself!

The latter is not as big of a deal as it sounds.

The National Mall already hosts a spectacular variety of outdoor events on the Mall spaces where complex display spaces are temporarily built, secured and just as quickly dismantled, grass re-seeded, and by Monday the Mall is back to normal.

Boom!

For art, all we need is protection from the weather and security. Perhaps even a combination of "free" (to the public) set of exhibitors (maybe out on the Mall) coupled with a paid admission set of exhibitors inside SI spaces -- or just make them all free to the public?

Details... details...

This new fair model would be open to both commercial art galleries and art dealers, as well as to art schools, and (and here's the key "and") to individual artists and cooperative artist-owned galleries.

Size matters… just ask Salvador Dali, who once said: “If you can’t paint well, then paint big!”

Would 1200 galleries, dealers, schools and artists in a mega, new-model art fair raise some interests from art collectors to come to DC for a long weekend in May?

It would if it attracted 100,000 visitors to the fair instead of 10,000 (like the looooong gone art fair artDC once attracted).

Are you aware that in May the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival in nearby Bethesda attracts 30-40,000 people to the streets of Bethesda for this artist-only street fine arts fair? or that also in May the Northern Virginia Fine Arts Festival attracts the same number of people to the streets of the Reston Town Center to buy art from individual artists?

Both Bethesda and Reston have two of the highest median household incomes in the US. And I am told that the Greater Washington, DC region has the second highest concentration of multi-millionaires in the world.

The money is here - the key is to get the disposable income crowd in touch with the art.

Both Bethesda and Reston manage to accomplish this one weekend each year. Do not, under any circumstances assume that these are "street fairs" where teddy bears, country crafts, and dried flowers are sold. These are both highly competitive fine arts outdoor fairs where artists from all over the nation come to and compete for spots because artwork sells well.